One of the two Supreme Court Justices, Sylvester Nwali Ngwuta, arrested by the Department of State Ser­vices (DSS) for alleged corrup­tion has been dragged to the Federal High Court, Abuja.
Justice Nguuta was among the seven justices arrested and later released on bail recently by the DSS for alleged sharp prac­tices.

Acting on a communication from the Attorney-General of the Federation and Minister of Justice, Mallam Abubakar Mala­mi (SAN), the National Judicial Council (NJC) had last week suspended the affected judges from sitting.

Justice Ngwuta will face a nine-count criminal charge of money laundering and corrup­tion before the court when his trial begins.
The DSS had begun investi­gation into alleged corrupt prac­tices of judicial officers which metamorphosed into the execu­tion of search warrants in their official homes between 7 and 8 October, 2016.
The defendant, in the infor­mation filed before the Feder­al High Court, Abuja by the of­fice of the Attorney-General of the Federation (AGF), Justice Ngwuta was accused of retain­ing in his possession the sum of N35,358,000 contrary to the Money Laundering (Prohibi­tion) Act 2011 (as amended).
He was also accused of re­taining in his possession the sum of $319,596 and £25, 915, all of which according to the govern­ment, formed part of the pro­ceeds of unlawful act contrary to the Money Laundering Act.
The search of Ngwuta, ac­cording to the prosecutor, re­vealed four diplomatic pass­ports, one official and two standard Nigerian passport passports, all in the name of the defendant.
The government said that the apex court justice’s pos­session of multiple passports contravened Section 10 of the Immigration Act, 2015 and pun­ishable under the same Section.
He was alleged to have made false statement to the Passport Office on his date of birth for the purpose of procuring an addi­tional Diplomatic Passport for himself. Justice Ngwuta was also accused of having in his posses­sion two valid Diplomatic Pass­ports and thereby committed an offence under Section 10 of the Immigration Act.
The case has not been as­signed to a judge at the time of filing in this report last night.
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